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Posts Tagged ‘pubmed’

National Library of Medicine Update (MLA13 Boston)

Photo of a slide showing user expectations, ILL librarian expectations, and an ideal future.

Slide from presentation showing What users want out of ILL. What ILL librarians think are issues with ILL currently. What a perfect world future of ILL would look like.

This year I got to go to the annual presentation by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) at MLA.  NLM is an important medical library resource, as it provides many free, trustworthy health, medicine, and science research resources to the public.  The NLM Update provides information on any important changes by NLM in the last year, as well as just any information/resources they would like to highlight.

  • clinicaltrials.gov
    • have data available of national origin of studies
    • you can build your own specialized view if you’d like to
    • a unique source of summary results for many trials
    • NN/LMx training for librarians coming soon
  • standardization makes information more usable
  • SNOMED Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT)
  • Genetic Testing Registry
    • 3,005 tests registered by 290 labs in 37 countries
    • useful inks for EHRs (Electronic Health Records)
    • international standard for location of genetic variations
  • PubMed Health
    • more digitized guidelines
    • specifically focused on flu site
    • working on global microbial identifier for food-borne pathogens
  • FY 2013 budget
    • lost 5.5% annum ($19.2 million less)
    • people are the most important NLM resource.  Call them “brain-ware.”
  • Index Cat
    • XML data available for 3.7million citations
    • index journals we trust cover-to-cover to keep up
  • NLM exhibits
    • Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness” is current exhibit.
    • There is an app of the interviews portion of the exhibit available on iTunes
    • The NLM traveling exhibition program has been booked by 457 institution in 48 states.
    • The Harry Potter exhibit grew out of last-minute attempt to make science interesting to middle schoolers.
    • Traveling exhibits consist of 6 banners that can be rolled into mailing tubes for quick shipment.
    • You must do local programming to borrow an exhibit
  • NLM Associate Fellowship Program
  • MedPrint
    • a program to get libraries to commit to keep print runs of journals
    • check page to see what’s been saved already
  • Environmental Health and Toxicology
  • Disaster Information Management Research Center
  • Inter-Library Loan (ILL)
    • requests down almost 50% in last 10 years in Docline
    • investigating this
    • conference call with focus groups representing:
      • hospitals
      • large academic libraries
      • special libraries
    • not planning to take Docline away
    • national survey in March 2013
      • 60% hospitals
      • agreed journals are electronic now
      • disagreement on if licenses are easy to understand
  • MedlinePlus
    • 15 years old in English, 10 years old in Spanish
    • multiple language link –> follows US medical practices, also available in English translation
    • US is 37% of users
    • very active twitter account
    • mobile site
      • going through usability study
      • More Spanish speaking males use than females.  More English speaking females use than males.
      • most of us want the full site not the mobile site
  • MedlinePlus Connect
    • allows EHR to send a code and get back patient-specific health information
  • 5 day posting of jobs is a requirement of the government to speed up hirings.  It is not a sign that they already know who to hire.

After the NLM Update, I attended the poster sessions.  This is not something one tends to take notes at, so I don’t have very much to say about them, except that I am proud of my medical librarian friend who had a poster in the session. Go Katie!

Up next, the final plenary session! Phew!

The Rise of Evidence-Based Health Sciences Librarianship (MLA13 Boston: Janet Doe Lecture by Joanne Gard Marshall, AHIP, FMLA)

The third plenary is given by a librarian who is respected in the field, but who is not the current MLA president.  Last year, we had a fascinating lecture by Mark Funk in which he showed us his extensive research documenting what librarians talk about in our published literature.  This year, Joanne Gard Marshall presented “Linking Research to Practice: The Rise of Evidence-Based Health Sciences Librarianship,” which while an interesting title mostly came across as a list of names of people she considered important.  She also spent 5 to 10 minutes summing up Mark Funk’s previous speech.  I think my tweet from during this plenary sums up my feelings pretty well:

Screenshot of a tweet reading #mlanet13 ehhhh summing up previous yr's doe lectures isn't very impressive as a doe lecture itself As with any lecture, though, I was still able to glean some useful or interesting information from it.  I’ve listed them out below.

  • David Sackett founded Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and his textbook Evidence-Based Medicine: How to Practice and Teach EBM, 2e is considered crucial in the field.
  • Sackett defines EBM as, “The conscientious, explicit, judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.”
  • Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is influenced by three factors:
    • Best research
    • Clinical expertise
    • Patient values and preferences
  • The old indexing (in PubMed etc…) didn’t used to include type or level of evidence in the terminology.
  • Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL) is advocated for by McKibbon and Eldredge.  You may see a free PMC article summing that up here.
  • Steps of EBL:
    • formulate answerable question
    • search for evidence
    • critically appraise evidence
  • The research section of MLA has a free journal, Hypothesis, that is recommended.
  • MLA has a research imperative that you may read here.
  • “Randomized Control Trials, contrary to popular belief, are not the only way to control variables.”
  • Booth and Brice are named as big names in EBL.  Their book is Evidence-Based Practice for Information Professionals: A Handbook.
  • There is a journal on EBL called Evidence Based Library and Information Practice.  It is free, but you must register to comment or receive email notifications of new issues.
  • Recommends the book Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rodgers to help with where we are going in EBL.  Take the model presented and adapt it and truly make it work for us.
  • Research must be balanced and paired with professional knowledge.

While the information I garnered is good, for a one hour lecture, it’s not very much. I left off the lists of names of previous Janet Doe lecturers, for instance.  I believe that if Marshall had focused much more in on the topic of EBL and its connection to EBM, which is an interesting topic, that it would have been a much better lecture.  Instead this received only a portion of the time so that we could be subjected to the names of previous Janet Doe lecturers and of course lists of people to thank. I am pleased to have found two new open access journals to read for my profession, but I do wish the lecture had gone further.

Up next is section programming.

 

July in Medical Libraries

Just as with any public service job, there are seasons of business in libraries, and those vary with type of library.  Academic libraries see a drastic increase in use at the end of each semester.  Even the students who planned well still have finals to study for and last-minute research to do!  This month I’ve been enjoying seeing my public librarian friends preparing for and starting various summer reading programs.  Summers are a busy time for public libraries!  Kids are out of school, people are vacationing, and there’s the ever-present summer reading programs of course.  If I ever end up working in a public library, I know I’ll enjoy the summers as I love being busy at work, and I absolutely adore summer reading programs.

In my current medical library, however, all has been pretty quiet this month.  Why is that?  Well, hospitals operate on a different yearly schedule than other learning institutions.  Hospitals start new residents and medical students in July.  This means that by June most of the people in the hospital who will use the library the most are old hats at it.  They come in, sure, but they don’t need too much research help.  On the other hand, July…..

Well, there’s a reason your doctor friends advise you not to get sick in July.  July is when the new residents start.  They’re super-excited!  They’re super-busy!  It’s kind of like having a bunch of freshmen in your library, only freshmen who are on an insanely tight schedule and carry beepers they have yet to entirely figure out how to use and who often are so terrified of getting sued or are so diligent about being excellent doctors that they request research for evidence-based medicine for every single decision.  It’s busy as all heck, but to me, it’s also a lot of fun.  These young doctors are still so passionate about their work.  They desire so badly to make a difference.  They’re so profoundly grateful every time you help them, even if it’s just pointing them to a phone to call to see what that page was about.  Their passion and belief in their ability to change the world reignites my own.

So while you academic librarians enjoy your summer respite and public librarians rush around with everything summer reading, I’ll be gearing up for and teaching new residents all about how to find the evidence for practicing evidence-based medicine.

And where there’s wifi.

And what SafeBoot is.

And where they can sleep.

And where phones are for returning pages.

And where the residency training rooms are.

And enjoying every minute of it.