Home > American Culture, Society, Wolf Bite Wednesday > Wolf Bite Wednesday (Gardening Is Not Elitist)

Wolf Bite Wednesday (Gardening Is Not Elitist)

I’m sure you’ve heard the people claiming it’s elitist to backyard or container garden.  The “reasoning,” apparently, is that because other people in the world have to farm to subsist, doing so when you don’t have to is rude to them.  Or something like that.  Excuse me, but the assumption that farming is something you only do until you can afford not to is what’s elitist.  It’s looking down on farmers.  It’s looking down on people who are actually willing to get their hands dirty to sustain themselves.  It’s looking down on everyone who works along the line to make the packaged, processed foods these so-called humanitarians eat.

There is, of course, a place for production farming.  It’s a great way to produce a lot of food in a short amount of time at a relatively low price to feed a bunch of people.  It’s obviously far more logical to have a large farm of rice paddies than for me to attempt to make my own rice paddy in Boston.  I’m laughing just thinking about it.

But what about your backyard that is currently just grass?  What about your balcony that’s decorated only with chairs and a few garden gnomes?  What about the 3 feet of space in my kitchen that’s too small to fit an appliance or table in, so is currently just wasted space?  If I grow vegetables and/or fruit there, I’m:

  • Using space that would otherwise be wasted for a valuable purpose
  • Lessening my environmental impact, which is a benefit for everyone
  • Becoming more self-reliant, which is always a good thing
  • Maintaining important knowledge to help pass down to future generations

These people seem to think that big business manufacturing is The Answer to all societal problems, but it isn’t.  It isn’t too hard to imagine a future where no one knows the basics.  Where no one is in touch with the earth or with their food or with their clothing or with the animals.  We’re practically living in it now.  Just look at the obesity epidemic, the violence, the general feeling of ennui permeating modern life.  We’ve become so caught up in the power of manufacturing that we’ve forgotten even good things are bad if they aren’t in moderation.  It’s great that I can get rice and tofu in the store–those aren’t exactly things that I can grow in my backyard.  But it’s also great that I can grow a tomato in my kitchen.  Nothing teaches you where food comes from quite so well as planting the seed, nurturing the plant, and harvesting the fruit yourself.  It’s empowering.  It’s understanding on a close, personal level what we as people are capable of with our opposable thumbs and big brains.  Gardening isn’t elitist.  It’s bringing a sense of humanity back to a people whose culture continually tries to rob them of it.

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  1. April 7, 2010 at 9:26 am

    I think that whomever says that gardening is elitist is someone who doesn’t know how to garden, doesn’t understand the process of self-sufficiency beyond microwave meals, and doesn’t comprehend the impact that processing does on the body OR that sustaining plant life can do for themselves and the planet.

    This would be another person to whack with a science textbook. Unless said textbook is from TX.

    • April 7, 2010 at 9:50 am

      Lol! I may have to start a list of people you’ve granted me permission to whack with science textbooks. 😉

      Also, you’re very spot-on.

  2. April 19, 2010 at 4:24 am

    Well said, wolfshowl. I grew up on a farm with a large vegetable garden. It feels good to get a little of that self-production back.

    • April 19, 2010 at 10:38 am

      Thank you–both for the compliment and for stopping by!

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