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Posts Tagged ‘body image’

Friday Fun! (The Gym and Body Image)

April 1, 2011 8 comments

Hello my lovely readers and a happy April Fool’s Day to you!  There’ll be no tricks on my blog, but if you want to have some fun, be sure to check out ThinkGeek‘s home page today.  🙂

In any case, today I want to talk to ya’ll about body image and the gym, because I think it’s something that keeps a lot of folks out of the gym when it shouldn’t.  When I joined the gym one of the things I was the most nervous about was exercising, changing, showering, sauna-ing (is that a word?  It should be) around other people who might be judging me.  Yes, I have fairly good body image, but I’m still a person and struggle with it periodically.  I mean really, who doesn’t?  Beyond not wanting to have men hogging the weights and hitting on me, I also joined a women only gym purely because I wanted to be in the company of other women who hopefully wouldn’t be judgmental pricks like certain girls in highschool tend to be.  But I was just like “Fuck it.  I won’t let the possibility of some women being bitches to me keep me from being healthy,” so I joined.  And you know what?  It has been the best body image experience of my life, and no, that is not just because I’m getting more confidence in my body’s abilities.

I have not once heard a single woman say a single derogatory thing about another woman in my gym.  Not once.  The women are astoundingly kind.  The women are universally thoughtful of each other and profusely kind at sharing equipment and amenities.  I have never once heard a personal trainer say the f-word (fat).  I have never seen a trainer yelling at a woman.  I have never seen a class instructor without a smile on her face.  I’ve only heard trainers and instructors encouraging women, telling them, “Society tells you you can’t do this because you’re a woman, but I’m telling you that your body is amazing, and you can.”

But it goes beyond that.  I see women of all shapes, sizes, ethnicities, races in the locker room, and you know what?  That has just totally opened my eyes to the fact that the Hollywood ideal, society’s mantra of what a woman *should* look like just simply does not reflect reality.  And I find every woman I encounter in the locker room and sauna beautiful in her own unique way.  And I got to thinking, if I find them beautiful, if they’re here doing their thing with their body, then why should I ever diss my own body or get down on it or not embrace it?  My body is amazing.  It can do seriously amazing things.  I can bench press weights.  I can hold the dancer’s pose.  I can run.  I can do chin-ups.  I can almost touch my forehead to the floor.  Plus, my body can nurture life or not, as I see fit.  My body can do all these things and is simultaneously uniquely mine, and that is what makes it so awesome.

The Self Magazine Controversy

August 12, 2009 4 comments

We all are peripherally aware of the fact that a bit of photoshopping is done on magazine covers.  We expect that a fly-away piece of hair in the model’s face might be shopped out or an odd-looking shadow, for instance.  I thought this was about making sure the lighting didn’t make the model/actress/singer look unreal and probably a bit about smoothing out an imperfection that woman is insecure about, like a blemish she had that day.  So when the Kelly Clarkson on the cover of Self controversy came out this week, I was angered on behalf of Kelly.

Essentially, Self shopped off around 20 pounds from Kelly’s frame. Not at her request.  Not with her permission.  In fact, Kelly was appearing in Self to talk about how she’s happy with what she looks like and isn’t letting the “zomg she’s fat and not perfect!” gossip get her down.

Did you catch that?  They photoshopped a singer appearing in the magazine to talk about being comfortable with her weight to look skinnier.

But it gets worse.

Jezebel dug up the Self editors’ response, which did not consist of apoligies, but instead states that this sort of thing is their general method of operation.  When models show up they look so real that they “could be mistaken for a member of the crew or the editorial team.”  The horror.  They then go on to state that they extensively photoshop every cover model, because “It is…meant to inspire women to want to be their best. ”

No, Self, you’re not inspiring women to be their best.  You’re guilt-tripping women to continually attempt to achieve a look that is so impossible you have to photoshop models and celebrities to make them appear that way!  God forbid women look like women.  There are many body types.  What makes a person beautiful isn’t their body type; it’s health and who they are as a person.  Some women have boobs and a big butt.  Others naturally lack curves.  Some women have stick-straight hair; others have frizzy fly-away hair.  But no woman’s body is flawless.

Having flaws, both physically and as a person, is part of being a human being.  Presenting to women, and to the little girls who are bound to see these magazine covers, that this body type that is only possible through photoshop as a tangible possibility is harmful.  You’re telling them that it’s their fault they don’t look like this.  They could look like this if they just work hard enough.  If they follow your crazy fad diets.  If they apply every creme in your magazine to their skin.  If they would just spend an hour in the morning doing their hair and applying makeup, not to mention the two to three hours at night working out.  Clearly striving to keep our bodies healthy isn’t good enough, is it, Self?

This photoshop controversy is worse because Self purports to be about women having healthy bodies, not fashion like Elle or Vogue.  The public expects them to feature healthy women on the covers, not a photoshopped fantasy of what women supposedly should look like.

A online commenter pointed out that this is women hurting other women’s body images.  He’s right.  Women put out this magazine.  Women are putting this image out there, causing other women to obsess and waste their time attempting to achieve the impossible, not to mention putting an impossible ideal into men’s heads.  Shame on you, Ashley Mateo and Lucy Danziger.  You are the worst type of misogynist–a female one.