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Cross-Stitch #14: Fiddleheads

I’m happy to announce that I’ve finished designing and stitching the second item in my Foraging New England line.  I actually finished this a few weeks ago, but I gave the completed stitch away as a present, and I didn’t want to post it until I had given it away.  Didn’t want to spoil the surprise!

The second plant featured in the Foraging New England line is: fiddleheads!

Cross-stitch of a pair of fiddleheads. Fiddleheads is stitched above, matteucia struthiopteris is below.Fiddleheads are young ferns before their fronds have unfurled. They are foraged by New Englanders for use as a vegetable, generally boiled or steamed and served alongside a main course.  The pattern is stitched on oatmeal aida with the common name (fiddleheads) above the plant, and the scientific name (matteuccia struthiopteris) below it.  This is done to reflect older hand-drawn plant guidebooks.

Both the completed item and the pattern are available in my shop!  Completed items ship to the US, the European Union, and Japan.  Patterns ship worldwide as an instant digital download.

Use the coupon code INSTAFID1ST through the end of the day Saturday, July 19th to get 25% off either item!

ETA 3/5/15: I have now closed my Etsy shop, but I’ve made my patterns available on my Cross-Stitch page.

Cross-Stitch #13: Rhubarb

Since I finished the Miffy / Nijnjte line for my shop, it was time to think of a new one! I knew I wanted to do something to pay homage to New England, both where I grew up and my current home.  It’s a truly beautiful place.  The spring weather and planting my (incredibly tiny) container gardening got me to thinking about plants.  Then it struck me.  I could make a line about the plants you can forage for in New England!  Foraging is the act of gathering plants that grow wild to eat, as opposed to gardening.  My grandmother on my father’s side was incredibly knowledgeable about foraging.  She passed her knowledge on to my dad, who passed it on down to me.  Of course, my father knows more about it than I do! I consulted him some on the new line on everything from which plants to choose (there are so many edible wild plants in New England!) to getting the look of each plant just right.  I decided that I would include with the plant itself the common name and the scientific name.  The line is intended both to decorate and educate.

The plant I chose to stitch up first for the new line is: rhubarb!

Cross-stitch of a rhubarb leaf. The word "rhubarb" is above it while the words "rheum rhabarbarum" are below it.Rhubarb features in my favorite pie, strawberry-rhubarb pie!  It can also be used in everything from breads to jams to drinks.  It has a savory, bitter flavor, so it generally is combined with something sweet to bring out its underlying sweetness.  The pattern is stitched on oatmeal aida with the common name (rhubarb) above the plant, and the scientific name (Rheum rhabarbarum) below it.  This is done to reflect older hand-drawn plant guidebooks.

Both the completed item and the pattern are available in my shop!  Completed items ship to the US and the European Union.  Patterns ship worldwide.

Use the coupon code INSTARHU1ST today or tomorrow to get 10% off either item!

ETA 3/5/15: I have now closed my Etsy shop, but I’ve made my patterns available on my Cross-Stitch page.