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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

The Ethical Challenges of Information Usage in the Age of Digital Media (Social Sciences Librarian Boot Camp 2012)

Yesterday (Friday, June 1st), I went to the Social Sciences Librarian Boot Camp hosted by Tufts University’s Tisch Library.  I’ll be posting my notes from the various sessions I attended, with the exception of the GIS session in the afternoon, since that was more hands-on than note-taking oriented.  First up are my notes from the keynote, presented by Dr. Amy Glasmeier..  I fully admit they are a bit sparse since I was also juggling my morning coffee and a strawberry filled croissant. 🙂

  • Libraries can be centers for visualization of data.
  • Scientists right now use Excel spreadsheets to keep track of data. We need better software!
  • Ever increasing world of tailored information.
  • Professional development will be critical.
  • Who will train the trainers?
  • Don’t wait to be asked by the faculty or students for help.  Be proactive.

 

 

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What Librarians Talk About (MLA12 Seattle: Plenary 3: Janet Doe Lecture by Mark E. Funk, AHIP, FMLA)

The first plenary is given by the MLA president, the second by someone who is not necessarily a librarian but has something interesting to say that will aid us in our profession.  The third plenary, however, is given by a librarian.  Mark E. Funk’s presentation was entitled, “Our Words, Our Story: A Textual Analysis of Articles Published in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association/Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1961 to 2010.”  Here are my notes.

  • An analysis of the words revealed four key areas that librarians talk about: environment, management, technology, and research.
  • Although we talk more about building than people, that gap is narrowing.
  • We are basically almost not talking about books, but we are increasingly talking about journals.
  • Reference is steady.  Searching is increasing.
  • Information is the #2 word.
  • As our information world becomes more complicated, we are talking more and more about teaching.  “I predict teaching will become ever more important.”
  • We are now concerned about what we can do to improve health.
  • New groups we’ve reached out to include: clinicians, consumers, and patients.
  • We use management words to tell our story.
  • We are no longer running our libraries like academic environments; we are running them like businesses.
  • We are early adopters and write about it.
  • Sometimes new technology becomes so embedded in our lives that we don’t mention it anymore.  For example, you say you talked to someone but don’t mention the telephone.
  • Our attention has shifted from automating to digitizing.
  • We don’t talk about the internet.  We talk about the web and navigation.
  • The word with the sharpest rise and fall is: Gopher
  • IMRaDification of our profession.  (IMRaD–Intro, Methodology, Results, Discussion)
  • MLA strategic plan encouraged us to do more research, and we responded.
  • Hockey Stick terms–little to no use, sharp recent uptake.  May indicate future usage but it could be a drastic rise and fall. Only time will tell.
  • EHRs are white hot now. (EHR–Electronic Hospital Record)
  • Why do we study history?  It’s very good at explaining change.  Answers the question, how did we get here?
  • De-emphasis on physical.  Emphasis on information.  Prefer evidence-based.
  • Emphasis on health.  Expanded audience.  Outside the library.   Teaching people.
  • Libraries more business-like. Technophiles. More research articles using IMRaD.
  • History can hint at the future, but it can’t predict it.
  • Our story is being written every day.  We can’t skip chapters to see what happens next.

Friday Fun! (Grad School Returns)

February 5, 2010 4 comments

Grad school is fully back in swing.  While I still wish I could miraculously have the copious amount of time I had over winter break when I was just working full-time, instead of working full-time and attending grad school part-time, I don’t totally hate my classes this semester. Yet.

One of my classes is on being an academic librarian in science and technology.  The professor is an adjunct, which means he works in the field and knows what he’s talking about.  Miraculously, I have yet to loathe any of my fellow students in that class.  In fact, I even like some of them.  A couple of them were in my medical librarianship class last spring, and I enjoy hanging out with them while they smoke on our break.  They don’t have this false sense of being superheroes a lot of students in the program do.  They just want a good, stable career, like me.

My other class is an online one on academic libraries.  I’ve found I learn more in online classes, not sure why.  I pretty much can’t stand any of my fellow students in it, but that’s ok.  It’s easy to just roll your eyes at the statements made when you’re not trapped in a classroom with them.  I like the professor though, and the assignments seem like I’ll actually learn something from them.

I’ve reached the climax in the novella that I’m writing.  I’m excited to get to edit it and send it off to a friend for critique.  I seem to actually be following through on my, totally not officially made but thought about a lot, resolution to write my novellas/books more.  I really feel like the time I’m spending working on improving my writing is well spent, which is a pretty darn good feel good pill.  Maybe someday you guys will get to review my books! Lol.

Happy weekend!