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Friday Fun! (Staycation Report)

Hello my lovely readers!  I hope you didn’t miss me *too* terribly much while I was on vacation.  😉  I must say, a vacation was exactly what I needed.  I had a lot of time to think without the stress of work or job hunting or school or any of that hanging over my head, and I feel like my head is screwed on much more straight now, I must admit.  I’m re-focused and have new energy.

So what all did I get up to?  Well, I went out for Asian fusion with one of my friends.  The mix of sushi, seaweed salad, and kushiyaki was awesome, but of course the highlight of the meal was the White Crane sake.  Nom.  That is all I have to say about that.  I also hit up a local pub that has a huge, huuuuge beer selection.  My friend calls it “the cheesecake factory of beer.”  Damn straight.  It just so happened that the final game of Bruins vs. Montreal was on, so we got to take that in with the crowd as well.  It was quite the memorable night.

I also met up with a member of Team Unicorn for lunch.  I so rarely get to see any of them outside of our periodic gatherings.  I also spent an afternoon reading by the Charles (and getting sunburned), as well as taking in the sights at the MFA.  I wanted to see the Chihuly exhibit, but I never did find it.  In fact, I had trouble getting out of the Asian and Ancient Europe section.  Ah well.

A friend and I hung out and made this incredible recipe of doom.  It was amazing. And there was strawberry jam all over my floor the next morning.

As you can see from my post earlier this week, I also took in the Boston Ballet for the first time since I was very young.  I had a fun time, but I must say it was not what I was expecting.  I also finally tried Zaftig’s restaurant for the first time after hearing it highly praised among Team Unicorn for a very long time.  I had an in-house made black bean burger, and I admit, it was the best one I’ve had in the Boston area.

I spent a day riding my bike around the city, partaking in a session with my trainer, and lounging around Harvard Square and on the river.  After that, I got the urge to spring clean.  I sorted, organized, recycled, and bagged up four trash bags of items to donate this week.  I also started scrubbing down the walls, but still have a few left to do.  My whole apartment feels so much lighter, fresher, and more homey now.  I’m so glad I took the time to spring clean.

That was pretty much my staycation, and I think I did a fairly good job keeping it well-rounded.  I’ve returned refreshed, and I must say that I fully intend to not let so much time go on before I take another one again.  Happy weekends!

Review of the Boston Ballet’s Performance of Bella Figura (2011)

While on my staycation, I decided to take in some of the cultural sights/events around my fair city that it’s normally difficult to find the time to do.  One of these was the Boston Ballet.  I just went with whatever show happened to be playing the weekend of my vacation, and this happened to be Bella Figura–a modern ballet.

Since we weren’t allowed to take pictures inside the Boston Opera House at all, we’re just going to hope that my words will suffice in explaining the complete unexpectedness of the ballet.

My friend and I were uncertain as to what, exactly, the ballet was supposed to be about, so naturally we consulted our programs.  The most clear line in the entire description was, “Standing in the darkness and staring into a sharp light with eyes closed.”  There is so much wrong with that sentence.  If you are standing in the darkness, there is no sharp light.  If your eyes are closed, you aren’t staring into anything…..

In any case, the first act opened on a blue background with stools in the back.  The word “the” on a plaque was on the floor at the front of the stage.  This, combined with the dancers’ blue and white traditional attire, conspired to give the appearance of a typical dance studio.  The music was electrical and came from the speakers, not the orchestra pit.  The dancing was firm, vibrant, and called to mind the gang dance scenes from West Side Story.  Simultaneously crazy and choreographed, it elicited pure joy in myself at the playfulness of the whole thing.  I honestly wasn’t entirely sure what the message was, but to me, it was that craziness can be fun.  It ended with one of the male dancers firmly kicking over the plaque.  To me, this symbolized defeating the norm.

The second act consisted of three scenes of pairs of dancers obviously supposed to be emulating romantic relationships.  This was the only act that the orchestra made an appearance for.  All three dances were clearly about romantic relationships, yet each relationship was unique and exquisite.  Of particular note was the second romantic pairing which had a gorgeous moon background, dry ice fog, and the most sensual ballet dancing I personally have ever seen.  It brought tears to my eyes and my friend and I commented to each other that the dances beautifully represented the push and pull, good and bad of all romantic relationships.  It was touching in the pure universality of such relationships.

The third act, however, was quite simply, baffling.  It opened with a set of flashing blue tubes rising from the floor, giving the illusion that the dancers had set up a bomb or something.  The dancers then started dancing in time with the music, which was again pre-recorded, but not with each other.  The lead female dancer then came out in a tribal red skirt and topless.  The men were dancing in, essentially, boxer-briefs, which in and of itself was enjoyable, but evidently the outfit choice was to allow for the men to punctuate their dance moves by slapping themselves on the thigh.  The female lead then danced in front of a curtain with someone else behind the curtain who periodically groped her through the curtain, alternately hiding her breasts and showing them to the audience.  The toplessness came and went throughout the act with approximately six dancers (three male and three female) periodically appearing topless.  The other portions were taken up by dancers who, while clothed, essentially seemed to be doing a more graceful version of the robot.  Frequently during this portion there were three dancers on stage.  The only message I got from this act was that “threesomes can be really fun.”

Overall, I entirely enjoyed my visit to the ballet.  It was not at all the stuffy visit I was expecting.  Our usher was truly an awesome lady who just wanted us to enjoy our afternoons.  Our section was full of other 20-somethings who were capable of both strong emotions and simultaneously didn’t take anything too seriously.  Seeing such disciplined bodies in action was inspiring, and the first act spoke to my preference for alternative music and dance styles.  However, it must be said, what touched me the most at my core was the most traditional portion of the show–the second act.  Seeing relationships played out exquisitely in dance hearkens back to the origins of dance.  It is the second act that would make me go to the Boston Ballet again.