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Posts Tagged ‘irritable bowel syndrome’

Friday Fun! (Musings On My IBS)

June 15, 2012 4 comments

Hello my lovely readers!

This week I haven’t seen much of my library since I’ve been participating in the Science Librarian Boot Camp.  I’ll be posting my notes from the Neuroscience section next week, since I think those were the most interesting (at least so far).  Perhaps the capstone this morning will be inspiring as well and make the grade too though. 🙂

It’s been great to see some of my librarian friends this week, although the Boot Camp was a bit of a struggle.  I’ve been experimenting with eating less dairy for multiple reasons (primarily health).  I ate quite a bit of dairy on the first day of the conference and subsequently had a flare-up of my IBS.  Not pleasant, trust me. :-/  It was frustrating and frankly hard on me emotionally.  I’ve struggled with this syndrome for so many years and just when I think it’s mostly under control, something happens again.  Although I am passionate about heath, it is frankly sometimes difficult to have to be so incredibly strict on my diet, stress level, sleep amount, etc…. or pay the consequence of being physically ill almost immediately.  Trust me, I wish I could indulge in gluttony periodically with the only consequence being a few extra miles on the treadmill!  But I know in the grand scheme of things it’s a minor thing to have to deal with, and I am lucky that Boston is such a mecca of vegan food.  The key for me, I think, will be figuring out how much indulgence is acceptable to my body.  Nobody can be strict all the time!  In the meantime, FSM bless Boston for having indulgences like vegan cupcakes.

I also guess this just means I’m going to have to start requesting vegan food at the conferences.

This weekend I’m hoping to see one of my good friends, resume work on my next novel (tentacles, oh my!), and of course gym it.  Happy weekends!

 

 

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Book Review: Whitewash: The Disturbing Truth About Cow’s Milk and Your Health by Joseph Keon

March 31, 2011 4 comments

Cow relaxing on a glass of milk.Summary:
Joseph Keon seeks to combat the cultural myth of dairy being a necessary part of a healthy diet perpetuated by the milk moustache ads with his book citing multiple scientific studies that have been swept under the rug by those being paid by the dairy lobbyists.  Although Keon cares about animal welfare as well (and there is a chapter on the suffering of dairy cows), the book predominantly focuses on debunking multiple myths surrounding human consumption of dairy:  the overly-hyped “need” for calcium, that dairy is good for children, and the idea that dairy prevents disease.  Keon additionally alarmingly shows the various chemical, virus, and bacteria contaminants commonly found in dairy.  Citing multiple scientific studies, he unequivocally demonstrates that contrary to what the dairy industry and government want you to think, dairy is actually bad for your health.

Review:
I’ve been a vegetarian for five years as of January 2011 (working on my sixth year).  I’ve honestly stayed away from books on veganism, because I had a feeling vegans were right, and I could not see myself ever giving up cheese.  How odd that I could give up so many other things I was raised on like bacon, chicken nuggets, etc… but not cheese.  With my recent increased interest in my health, though, I had already decided to cut back on my cheese consumption, so I figured why not give a book on dairy a go.  The first few chapters were definitely pushing the buttons I already subconsciously knew–we don’t need dairy, it’s unnatural to consume the milk of another creature intended for their young, etc….  Where I suddenly found myself nodding along and saying yes, though, was when Keon got into the similarities between how adults and children act about cheese and addicts.  Keon starts the section by clearly defining addiction:

“Addictions are considered diseases because they are out of our control, often so much so that they lead us to behave in ways that are dangerous to our health.  In its most basic definition, an addiction occurs when we are physiologically or psychologically dependent upon a habit-forming substance or behavior, to the point where its elimination from our life may result in trauma or suffering.” Location 721

Keon then goes on to explain exactly what about cheese makes it so addicting when we know it’s bad for us.

“Research has shown detectable amounts of compounds identical to the narcotic opiate morphine in cow’s milk.  Study of the morphine found in milk has confirmed it has identical chemical and biological properties to the morphine used as an analgesic.  A plausible assumption is that all mammals produce this opiate compound to make sure their offspring return to the breast to acquire essential nutrients and to bond with the mother.”  Location 722

Whoa.  So cheese, basically, is morphine.  The chemical that is healthy for a calf to ingest as it causes her to return to the mother for food, comfort, and safety, when consumed by people causes us to return repeatedly in an addictive manner to a substance that is really, almost pure fat.  WOW.  You know those  life-changing moments?  I had one right there.

There are two other sections that are mind-blowing in Keon’s book.  The first deals with multiple first world “diseases” that are often actually allergic reactions caused by prolonged exposure to the allergen–cow’s milk.  When we take all races into consideration, most people are allergic to cow’s milk: 90% of Asian-Americans, 75% of African-Americans, 50% of Latino-Americans, and 25% of Caucasian-Americans (Location 900).  Yet despite these known statistics, the federal government continues to push dairy onto schools at the dairy lobbyists’ urgings.

“The policy of pushing milk upon children in inner-city schools is particularly problematic when we take race into account.  African-American children have a lactose intolerance rate of about 75 percent…..Worse, children who have made the healthful transition to beverages made from rice, soy, or almonds are out of luck when they get to school.  That’s because any public school in America that attempts to serve these beverages in place of cow’s milk will lose its federal support.” (Location 2163)

Being constantly exposed to an allergen in childhood can cause or exacerbate multiple issues such as colic, irritable bowel syndrome, eczema, acne, asthma, headaches, Crohn’s Disease, chronic nasal congestion, fatigue, depression, joint pain, and even autism.

Keon also addresses the issue of osteoporosis and breast cancer, two issues of utmost concern for women in particular.  Whereas women are told that drinking milk will help prevent the former and will not be a contributing factor in the latter, the science actually demonstrates both statements to be false.  If a woman follows a typical Western diet, the consumption of that much protein causes her body to become acidic and leech calcium.  Studies have shown that no amount of extra calcium consumed can keep up with the leeching.  This means that consuming three glasses of milk a day will do nothing for a woman following an omnivorous diet.  Add to this the fact that

“Milk has been associated with increased risk for breast cancer, and the combination of pesticides and radiation have been proposed as one possible explanation.” (Location 1816)

When the fact that dairy consumption does not prevent osteoporosis is combined with the association with breast cancer, one is left wondering why there aren’t government campaigns warning women to stay away from dairy to save their lives!  (Oh yeah.  The dairy lobbies.  Money.  It always comes down to money).  Further, studies have shown that

By age sixty-five, women who have followed a meat-centered diet have lost, on average, 35 percent of their bone mass, while women who have followed a plant-centered diet have lost only about half that amount: 18 percent.”  (Location 3195)

I’ve only touched on the surface of the shocking facts backed up by science contained in this book, focusing in on the ones that stuck out the most strongly to me.  If you have any interest at all in your health and/or the health of your children, I urge you to read this book.  Educate yourself on the facts instead of listening to government programs and advertising caused by dairy lobbyists who are only after your money.  Dig for the truth.  Read this book.

5 out of 5 stars

Source: Amazon

Buy It

Friday Fun! (On Tuesday!)

February 16, 2010 4 comments

I realized that I missed Friday Fun last week, and given that my current read is pretty long and a lack of movie watching, I haven’t posted since Thursday. My bad!

I took last Friday off of work and had Monday off for President’s Day.  Yay being a non-essential employee of a hospital!  I spent Friday running errands, shopping, and cooking.  I discovered a Stop n Shop that is closer to my apartment than the Shaws I had been frequenting, and let me tell you, their prices are insanely low!  Plus they have more vegetarian options than Shaws does.  I’m a total convert.

Also this weekend, I paid my first visit to the Apple Store’s Genius Bar.  It wasn’t for me; it was for someone else’s iPhone.  I haven’t dared to bring in my baby, erm, MacBook, even though it does this freaky thing where it restarts if I close it.  It took observing someone else using the Genius Bar for me to realize that they are totally awesome!  They’re like librarians’ nerdy twins, and you guys should totally make appointments to use them.  It was some of the best customer service I’ve ever seen.  Just be sure to make your appointment online before you go, or you’ll wind up waiting a while.

Hope you guys enjoy your evenings.  Don’t forget there’s a new episode of Lost tonight and a new Wolf Bite Wednesday tomorrow!

Invisible Illness Awareness Week

September 18, 2009 6 comments

I discovered via Random Musings from the Desert that this week – September 14-20 – is National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week.  I was unaware that such a week or an organization exists, but this is awesome!  Too often people suffering from illnesses without obvious symptoms are told it’s all in their heads.  Well, it’s not.  In honor of raising awareness, I decided to complete the groups’ 30 things questionnaire about my own invisible illness.

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

1. The illness I live with is: Irritable Bowel Syndrome

2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: 2006

3. But I had symptoms since: Well that’s hard to pin down.  I had minor symptoms periodically in my teens, but they grew insanely consistent and nearly unlivable in December 2005.  Imagine the worst stomach bug you’ve ever had.  Now imagine that lasting two months, but only showing up in the mornings and that was my life.

4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: My diet, my diet, my diet.  IBS caused me to become vegetarian and severely limits what processed foods I can eat.  It’s really hard to tell people “I can’t eat there” or “I can’t eat that,” because if they don’t know I have IBS then they relentlessly question me, mock my food choices, or even just assume that I’m picky and spoiled.

5. Most people assume: That symptoms are consistent.  That it’s my fault because I’m stressed out too much.  It’s true that stress-reduction techniques can help IBS symptoms, but stress does not cause IBS.  It’s true that sometimes I puke but not every time I’m symptomatic.  There’s nothing really consistent about IBS.

6. The hardest part about mornings are: Breakfast.  Do I attempt to eat breakfast? Should I eat even though I don’t feel hungry?  Lots of times I’m nauseous in the mornings.  Even if I’m not nauseous there’s no guarantee that eating breakfast won’t cause me to become symptomatic.

7. My favorite medical TV show is: Scrubs.

8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: My iPod (not sure what this has to do with anything…..)

9. The hardest part about nights are: Nights are actually usually the easy part for me as long as I ate well that day.

10. Each day I take __ pills & vitamins. I don’t take any consistently. Though I do try to take B12.  When I was first diagnosed, I took a lot more until I got the symptoms under control.  It was mostly herbs and digestive support alt med stuff.

11. Regarding alternative treatments I: would be in hell without them.  The regular medical doctors were only able to give me a pill that added passing out on top of my other symptoms.  A naturopath gave me dietary and exercise advice as well as the dietary supplements previously mentioned.  Changing my diet and exercise routines combined with those pills were a serious life-saver.  I went from being symptomatic every day to about two days a month.

12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: An invisible one.  It’s relatively easy to hide if I don’t feel like talking about it, which is most of the time.

13. Regarding working and career: Most of my jobs have been really understanding about it. Yay libraries!

14. People would be surprised to know: That people with IBS are at a higher risk for developing eating disorders, because they come to view food as evil.  This is not a big surprise since people with IBS know that the only time they are guaranteed no symptoms is when their digestive tracts are empty.

15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: That I can’t eat whatever I want anymore.   Also, the fact that when I’m symptomatic and puking in a public restroom, people always make snarky asides about me being either bulimic or pregnant.

16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: There’s nothing I thought I’d never be able to do again that I now can do.  I still can’t eat Pringles, for example. (Hey, I really like Pringles).

17. The commercials about my illness: Make it look like only women have it, and we all bloat up and stand around holding our stomachs.  They also make it seem like a pill could fix it, when it can’t. (yet)

18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: Again, being able to eat whatever I want!   Ah, to vary this up, how about puking only occurring the once in a blue moon I got a stomach bug.  Now it’s a monthly occurrence.

19. It was really hard to have to give up: Fried food. I can still eat it somewhat, but it’s risky.  I also miss Doritoes.  And bacon.

20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: Yoga!  It’s so beneficial for IBS symptoms.

21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: (repeating myself) Eat whatever the hell I wanted all day without worrying about how I’d feel later.

22. My illness has taught me: It led me to reading vegetarian cookbooks, which educated me about factory farms (terrible places).  It has also taught me to respect people’s food choices without asking them annoying questions about them.

23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: “It’s your fault because you’re too stressed.”

24. But I love it when people: Make a point to do the extra checking to make sure a restaurant we’re going to will have food I can eat.  I also love the various people who’ve held my hair when I’m throwing up.

25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: I really don’t have one.

26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: Skip the regular doctors and go alt med.  Make lifestyle changes and your symptoms will improve.

27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: How much other people care about my stomach.  In both the good and the bad sense. 😉

28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: Anybody who’s held my hair and/or cleaned up for me when I was too ill to is really high up there.

29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because: I think it’s a good cause!  I wasn’t even aware IBS existed when I was first symptomatic.  Awareness of these things is always a good thing.

30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: Honored. 🙂