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Book Review: Cycle of the Werewolf by Stephen King

June 27, 2015 4 comments

Book Review: Cycle of the Werewolf by Stephen KingSummary:
Something evil is haunting the small town of Tarker Mills, Maine. Every month another person is found dead, brutally ripped apart.  Can they solve what is haunting their town before the terror consumes them all?

Review:
I picked this up in a used book basement because I’m generally trying to read most everything Stephen King has written, and this particular print book was beautifully illustrated.  Each chapter (or month…or murder) had at least one full-color illustration, and that just spoke to me.  The story itself wound up being rather ho-hum to me, but part of that may be due to the fact that I’m rather hard to shock these days.

My favorite part of the book is that it opens with a note from King stating that astute readers will notice that the full moon couldn’t possibly have fallen on all of the big holidays he has it fall on, but that he’s taken artistic license to make it do so.  The passage reads like it has a wink at the end, and I like that King assertively addresses what could bother some readers or be a controversy and acknowledges that his facts are wrong, but he did it for artistic reasons.  Personally, I’m not a fan of books that take artistic licenses, but if you’re going to, this is the way to do it.  Acknowledge it (don’t hide from it) and move on.

This feels like an early Stephen King book.  The usual small town New England stock characters are there, but they’re not fully fleshed-out.  There’s even a spunky kid in a wheelchair who reminds me of an earlier version of Susannah from The Dark Tower series (the book about Susannah was first published in 2004).  The stock, rather two-dimensional characters work in this book, since the storytelling approach is basically one of folklore.  We don’t need to know much more about these characters than we see on the surface, and that’s fine.

Each chapter is a different month in the year, and they sort of feel like connected short stories.  By the last half of the year, the reader starts to know what’s going on, and the “short stories” become even more connected.

Fans of an underdog hero will enjoy who ends up battling the werewolf plaguing the town, as will those who enjoy seeing the trope of a trusted citizen being someone who should not be trusted.  (That’s as much as I can say without being too spoilery).

This all sounds rather positive, so why did I feel ho-hum about it?  The tension building didn’t work for me.  Nothing that happened really scared me.  The character in the wheelchair feels like a less bad-ass version of Susannah, and what I would want would be Susannah.  This is perhaps unfair of me to say, since Susannah came about further down the line, but I do think it points to how King’s writing improved with time (as does everyone’s).  I also just found the villain to be rather expected and cliche, although I’m sure it wasn’t when the book first came out.  In general, this book just doesn’t feel like it aged particularly well, especially when compared to other older King books.

Overall, if a reader is looking for a quick, beautifully illustrated folklore style retelling of a werewolf story, they will enjoy this book.  Those looking for high levels of tension or gore or in-depth character development will want to give it a pass.

3 out of 5 stars

Source: Brookline Booksmith, used books basement

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Reading Challenge Wrap-Up: Once Upon a Time IX

June 26, 2015 2 comments

Once Upon a Time IXHello my lovely readers! Once Upon a Time IX, the reading challenge I signed up for running between March 21st and June 21st focusing on reading books that fit into the categories of fantasy, folklore, fairy tales, or mythology is now over (it has been for 5 days, actually….), so it’s time to post my wrap-up!

I signed up for the level called “The Journey” reading at least one book in any of the categories named above, but I had a personal goal aiming for three books.  I wound up reading a whopping NINE BOOKS.  Particularly given that I used to think I didn’t like fantasy, I’m kind of blown away.

My completed reads for the challenge, in the order I read them:

  1. A Local Habitation by Seanan McGuire, 4 stars, review
  2. An Artificial Night by Seanan McGuire, 4 stars, review
  3. The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson, 4 stars, review
  4. Maplecroft by Cherie Priest, 4 stars, review
  5. Fables: Legends in Exile, Vol. 1 by Bill Willingham, 3 stars, review
  6. Cycle of the Werewolf by Stephen King, 3 stars, not yet reviewed, review
  7. Love in the Time of Global Warming by Lia Francesca Block, 3 stars, not yet reviewed
  8. Everlasting: Da Eb’Bulastin by Rasheedah Prioleau, 4 stars, not yet reviewed
  9. Fated by S. G. Browne, 3 stars, not yet reviewed

Unfortunately, as you can tell, I fell a bit behind actually reviewing the books during the challenge.  Ah well. This just means you can expect to see more fantasy reviews coming up now through July!

Have you enjoyed the influx of fantasy on my blog? Did you participate in the challenge too?