Home > average but on the shorter side, Book, Genre, Length, Review, scifi > Book Review: The Rest of the Robots by Isaac Asimov

Book Review: The Rest of the Robots by Isaac Asimov

Image of a digital book cover with a steel man (robot) emerging from the ground.

Summary:
A collection of 8 of Isaac Asimov’s classic robot short stories, divided into three sections: The Coming of the Robots, The Laws of Robotics, and Susan Calvin.

Review:
I often struggle to read short stories. For me, they often are just a bit too short for me to get fully invested into the world they’re set in, so they oddly drag in spite of being short. But this collection really worked for me, and I think that’s because the world was already fully established in my mind. It was just then a matter of what would happen with this particular iteration of a robot and the humans around it.

The world that pre-existed in my mind already was Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics (this explains them, if you’re not already familiar with them). Well, that combined with a world that had managed to make robots and engages in space exploration.

The book starts with an early generation robot who goes missing in a rural area and ends up at the behest of a rural man. This one made me laugh out loud, and not in a way that I think takes advantage of anyone. The second short story in this section looks at what happens when robots are sent in advance to a hostile alien planet. What I enjoyed about both of these is how the robots are so pure and so honest and how that throws everyone around them.

I thought the second section was the least engaging, but keep in mind I loved the collection so that’s barely a criticism. There’s a short story that’s very Cold War inspired about spies and robots. Then there’s also one that’s a human telling a tall tale about a robot breaking one of the laws. It’s left up to the reader to decide if it’s true.

The third section all feature the robopsychologist Susan Calvin. To me, it’s clear Susan is somewhere on the Autism spectrum, and I loved her. It did bother me a bit how everyone else in the stories describes Susan as cold and seems to question her femininity because they perceive her as lacking warmth and mothering qualities. But I also think this is a bit of a commentary – is Susan really like this or do others just perceive of her that way? I also really like how well she relates to the robots. She’s not a main character in each of the stories, but she does play a pivotal role in all of them. My favorite was “Galley Slave,” which is about a robot being brought into academia to do some ho-hum labor. Asimov was a professor of biochemistry, and the realness of the problems with academia are clear in the hilarious scifi and robot flavored commentary on that institution.

Overall, I really enjoyed these short stories. They’re a great example of how strong clear, rapid worldbuilding combined with characters formed quickly in broad strokes can make short stories work very well.

5 out of 5 stars

Length: 224 pages – average but on the shorter side

Source: Gift

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  1. Jeane
    August 25, 2021 at 7:59 am

    This does sound interesting. I’m intrigued by the idea that the character on the spectrum had more understanding towards the robots. I also often struggle with short stories- too many times they leave me feeling frustrated, they feel incomplete or leave the reader hanging, or just don’t have the amount of depth I enjoy. But every now and then I find a collection that works really well in the format.

    • August 25, 2021 at 4:07 pm

      Yes, I think having all of the short stories take place in the same world really worked for me, precisely because I didn’t become invested just to have the whole world dropped. (I’m a big fan of a creatively built world).

      Something I probably should have mentioned is the character on the spectrum, her special area of interest IS the robots, so it kind of makes sense she understands them best. 🙂

  2. August 27, 2021 at 10:08 am

    This one definitely sounds like it’s worth adding to my list!

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